Schlagwort-Archive: wildlife

Brazil/Salvador de Bahia: In the Cauldron of Magical Slave Energy

Brasilien: Candomblé Ritual, Salvador de Bahia | Candomblé spiritual ritual
Brasilien: Candomblé Ritual in Salvador de Bahia | Candomblé spiritual ritual in Salvador de Bahia

FOREWORD

The author, Gerd Michael Müller, born in Zürich in 1962, traveled as a photo-journalist to more than 50 nations and lived in seven countries, including in the underground in South Africa during apartheid. In the 80 years he was a political activist at the youth riots in Zürich. Then he was involved in pioneering Wildlife & eco projects in Southern Africa and humanitarian projects elsewhere in the world. As early as 1993, Müller reported on the global climate change and in 1999 he founded the «Tourism & Environment Forum Switzerland». Through his humanitarian missions he got to know Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and other figures of light. His book is an exciting mixture of political thriller, crazy social stories and travel reports – the highlights of his adventurous, wild nomadic life for reportage photography .

(please note that translation corrections are still in progress and images will follow soon)

During one of the first of a total of five trips to Brazil, after the Iguacu Falls, Rio de Janeiro, I also discovered Salvador de Bahia, the landing place of the Europeans and the first capital of Brazil. If you want to get to know the exotic facets of Bahian life, get ready for hot come-ons, cool rejections and delicious consolations, at least during Carnival. If you dive into the mystical world of the candoble and let yourself be overwhelmed by the overwhelming spirituality, you will leave the local world and fall into a trance to the point of ecstasy. A trip to Salvador de Bahia is like a departure to new shores. First of all, it is admirable how exhilarated the Baihanos go through life. Remarkable how they express their joy and sorrow.

The mystical world of gods and spiritual source of the Bahanos is reflected in the Candomble, which gave reason for the Christian mission, especially since Bahia was the starting point of the western explorers and conquerors. Not only the bastions along the coast testify to this. The roots of the slave tower are deeply anchored in the local culture. Especially the candomble spirituality, lived out in secret, bears witness to this. When hundreds of gospel singers resound with fervor, not only does the earth tremble, but the air in the far periphery also vibrates, as with an approaching hurricane. The psalm-singing Catholic boys‘ choir next door in the Sao Fransico monastery in the baroque old town district of Pelourinho really sounds rather pitiful.

Rarely does one discover such a playful people that has produced an incredible number of dance and musically gifted people. In Salvador de Bahia, the cradle of carnival and samba, there is no standing still or being stiff as a board. Everything is in flux, everyone is constantly on the move, more or less gracefully. Another Bahian specialty is capoeira, the martial art disguised as dance. Here, too, the graceful flowing movements are recognizable, flowing through the whole life and triggering impulses. But not only in expressing feelings also the body cult is on top of the agenda. In this the Bahianos hardly differ from the Cariocas. There is hardly an Adonis who does not present his athletically steeled body in his skimpy briefs. There is no woman who does not proudly walk around the beach in her Fio dental (tooth thread) bikini, flirting with her grace and freedom of movement. No wonder the church has sent more friars here than anywhere else in the world. In Salvador de Bahia alone, 165 houses of worship have been built.

In 2003, I was stationed in Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil for three months as a resident manager for a Swiss travel company and had a hell of a good time. Few guests, so no stress, a hotel room right on the Beira Mar (that’s like the Copacabana in Rio), and a good vehicle with which I could drive all the way to Jericoacoara to the fantastic sand dunes or south to Moro Branco. I was very attracted to the Brazilian lifestyle, music, language and cultures on previous trips, so I also learned a little Portuguese. Since I spoke Spanish well, it was easy for me to get started and I like the Brazilian dialects better than the harsh Spanish accents. I am also enchanted by the music of many Latin American sounds: from the tango in Argentina to the bossa nova of a Gilberto Gil in Brazil or the folk dance forro, as in Fortaleza, from the salsa and son in Cuba to the merengue in the Dominican Republic, all these musical styles and dance forms appeal to me very much.

In Fortaleza I lived during these three months as a Station Manager at Beira Mar, ideally located also for daily trips to the beautiful city beach Praia do futuro and at night to Praia do Iracema at the end of Beira Mar, where the tourist entertainment district with all the nightclubs was located, which was very convenient for the local tourist service. At the end of the three months, I was shipped off to Sinai, but after the six-month assignment in Sharm el Sheikh, I returned to Fortaleza unemployed because the tsunami had hit Asia and as a result all the travel companies needed fewer station managers and tour guides.

When I returned to Fortaleza, I lived for two months in the Serviluz favela with a friend who had a small brick house near Praia do Futuro and I felt quite comfortable there. Soon I knew a lot of people via Heldon and his friend Joaquin, and the neighbors in the favela also knew me, so I could move around freely there day and night. It was a comfortable time, because I had made good foreign exchange deals with the tourists in Sinai and before in Brazil. This was always a tolerable source of side income in this job. In Poland, I almost became a zloty millionaire. Then a friend from Switzerland visited me and we rented a „Highlux“, i.e. an off-roader, to drive up along the Brazilian coast from Fortaleza in the state of Céara via the states of Maranhão and Piaui to Manaus and to complete the return journey inland.

That’s a good 6000 kilometers we planned to cover in 11 days. The off-road driving was more comfortable than driving on the asphalt road, which was completely littered with holes, up to half a meter deep. The asphalt looked like it had been bombed over a wide area! Therefore, I often drove on the scree strip to the right of the roadway. There one comes basically faster ahead and whirled up strongly dust, which is to be seen already from a distance and prevents the accident danger. The journey went via Jericoacoara, with its fantastic dune landscape, which was surpassed in beauty by the crystal clear lakes in the sand dune landscapes in the next state of Maranhao. An extremely fascinating region! The deep blue Atlantic with lonely dream beaches to the left, a gigantic sand dune strip along the coast and inland the esmerad green jungle. The national parks of Jericoacoara and Lençóis Maranhenses on the Atlantic coast are unique biotopes.

I like deserts better than virgin forests. One gets on better. At least in 4×4. But even here, I would have been stranded without the help of the local fishermen, because on this trip numerous rivers had to be crossed. Except for one time it went quite well, but then we came to a river, which was shallow on our side first about 30 meters, then there was a small sand island in front of the place where the river flowed through a narrow, tearing mouth, like in a funnel. You could just make that out from 40 meters away, and it was probably the most dangerous part. „If I couldn’t cross the last ten meters after the tiny river island at full throttle,“ it would look bad, I thought.

And that’s exactly what happened. So I drove with a lot of speed through the 30 meters wide, shallow river towards the island, but got stuck there due to the slope and had too little momentum to cross the current channel with the ripping flow. and came to an abrupt stop with the engine hood stuck in the water at a 45 degree angle to three quarters. After a few hours, a couple of fishermen approached. Only thanks to a boat in the current channel that lifted the car a little and a car that pulled us back from behind with the wire rope over the shallow part of the river, we managed to get out of the river.

Another time, just as I was walking alone in the sweltering midday heat, I got stuck in deep quicksand. It took four hours, many drops of sweat and endless jerks for a few meters further. The sand was scorching hot, I shoveled like a madman for hours and didn’t think I would make it. But finally it worked out. And so the journey continued to Ilha do Maranhão, one of the largest alluvial areas in the world at the foothills of the Amazon. 800,000 buffalo populate the island, which belongs to only a few Hundert landowners who hardly employ any workers.

Where the animals pass in the dry season, a river course emerges in the rainy season. Thus, the fragile ecosystem and the thin layer of humus is destroyed in just a few years. Year after year, huge areas of virgin forest are being appropriated first for cattle breeding and then for intensive agriculture such as soy plantations. In the past 30 years, almost a quarter of the Amazon Delta has been destroyed. Yet the biodiversity here is unparalleled. In the Amazon alone there are over 2000 different fish. For comparison: In the whole of Europe there are just 150 species of fish. The same is true for all animal species, most of them are endemic.

The adventurous journey continued through the state of Piaui and from there we drove on to Manaus. Then again a good 3000 kilometers inland back to Fortaleza, where we visited the Gruta de Ubajara, Brazil’s largest caves with nine chambers and a depth of a good kilometer, at the Ubajara National Park, about 300 km west of Fortaleza. Now we come to the last and most special Brazil tripf Fortaleza.

Guyana 1997/2003: From the jungle directly into space

French Guyane: Two monkey’s riding on a Tapir

FOREWORD

The author, Gerd Michael Müller, born in Zürich in 1962, traveled as a photo-journalist to more than 50 nations and lived in seven countries, including in the underground in South Africa during apartheid. In the 80 years he was a political activist at the youth riots in Zürich. Then he was involved in pioneering Wildlife & eco projects in Southern Africa and humanitarian projects elsewhere in the world. As early as 1993, Müller reported on the global climate change and in 1999 he founded the «Tourism & Environment Forum Switzerland». Through his humanitarian missions he got to know Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and other figures of light. His book is an exciting mixture of political thriller, crazy social stories and travel reports – the highlights of his adventurous, wild nomadic life for reportage photography .

(please note that translation corrections are still in progress and images will follow soon)

Thanks to the cooperation with the „AOM“, which connected the French Départements d’outre Mèr, i.e. French Guyana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, the South Seas or New Caledonia with Paris, I flew almost once a year to Cuba and was also briefly on Guadeloupe, three weeks in the South Seas, and now flying to French Guiana in the backyard of the Grande Nation, „where the pepper grows,“ where political prisoners have been exiled on an island and the European Space Agency (ESA) has set up shop in Kourou. The most exotic of all EU members is known at best through the movie „Papillon“, as a former penal colony, and so the image of French Guyana is also characterized by diffuse ideas and shimmering legends. Guyana’s reputation as a homicidal land populated with hosts of venomous insects, fearsome tarantulas, deadly snakes, meter-long aligators and piranhas is probably true, but beyond that, the land where Europe spills, evaporates and disappears into verdant jungle thickets is one of the most stable in the region.

„The most dangerous creature here is man, followed by wasps,“ puts into perspective Philippe Gilabert, founder of „CISAME“ (Centre Initiation Survie et Aventure au Millieu Equatorial), an idyllic camp located in the middle of the green hell after about 60 kilometers of pirogue travel upstream on the banks of the Approuague River near the Brazilian border. „Humans,“ Gilabert, a former „Legion Etrangere“ paratrooper and terrorism expert, tells us, „are the most harmful creature to the fragile ecocycle of the primary forest. Then would come the wasps, but they are a threat only to the unwary human, added the then 43-year-old Frenchman, who worked as a paratrooper and terrorism expert, ironically.

He and Manoel, a Karipuna jungle Indian must know, because they specialize in bringing the wild jungle closer to as many civilized people as possible (than they would like) and offering 10 days of survival training to the toughest. So the civilization-impaired first practices archery, trapping, climbing, canoeing, fishing, making fire and building dwellings before having their own experience of what it’s like to have to survive in the jungle. So the jungle experts show the civilization-weary how to survive in the jungle and nature-lovers what treasures and functions the primary forest has and why it is absolutely necessary to protect it worldwide.

Among the guests of Mirikitares, the camp of the river people, as the Karipunas call this place, are reservists of European and North American armed forces as well as executives of companies who want to get their top shots in shape here. Even ordinary tourists get excited about fulfilling their dream and plunging into a daring jungle adventure. The fact that this is not a purely macho world is proven by the growing number of women who come here and can often easily take on the men with survival training. Either way, everyone gets to know themselves and their limits or abilities. The commitment goes to the substance of the mental and manageable, the survival mode switches on and amazing, existential insights open up to you. You suddenly realize how small and inconspicuous, how vulnerable and alone you are. You become the hunter and the hunted. A unique experience.

Having barely escaped the rainforest unscathed, new habitats open up, at least in the imagination, on a galactic trip to the moon, revealed to curious travelers in Kourou, not far from Guyana’s capital Cayenne, at the European Aerospace Center the „Centre Spacial“ of the (ESA). So it is from here that the journey into space starts. The place itself offers nothing, except for the usual third-world view of the country’s class hierarchy. In the old town live the socially weakest, the Creoles, Indians and white unskilled workers, surrounded by out of place looking concrete buildings for the middle class and on the beach the splendid villas of the Europeans, the scientists and employees of the space station in nearby Kourou.  After visiting the European Union Space Station, I take a boat to Devil’s Island, made famous as a penal colony in the movie Papillon.

The three islands off the coast, Ille Royale, St. Jospeh and Ille Diable, where political prisoners were held for years in extreme conditions before ending up under the guillotine. Some, it is said here, would have preferred to be eaten by sharks while fleeing through the sea than to have to continue suffering the earthly torment settled here. Guyana’s highlights include the country’s Wild West, especially the picturesque colonial town of St. Laurent-du-Moroni, on the border river with Suriname, which is well worth a visit. The colorful mixture of peoples, including Indians, raven pirogue drivers, bustling Indo-Chinese and Hmongs who came here via France to flee the Pol Pot regime, as well as Haitian cloth merchants, Dominicans and Creoles of all shades, and a few whites, was and still is impressively diverse.

On the last evening before our departure, we, a small group of journalists from Switzerland, made a late night pilgrimage through the harbor district of the capital Ceyenne and we were already quite drunk after the humid happy rounds in some bars. Obviously one had observed us, because at a rather dark crossing, suddenly from all sides a few figures stepped from the house cracks rapidly towards us. I could just still warn my companions with a loud call, then someone sprayed me from behind coming, tear gas in the eyes, whereupon I could see nothing more and inhaled of course the irritant gas also coughing. I whirled around like a dervish and began to swing my camera equipment around to keep the three attackers at a distance, which I could only see very dimly. Then I broke through on one side and ran up the street until I was out of breath and out of reach of the gang. My colleagues were also lucky and still managed to fight back. With this adventure behind us, we left the country the next day and flew back to Switzerland.

Laos 2013: River trips in the Golden Triangle and the Mekong Delta

Laos: Around 2000 Monks are collecting food in Luang Prabang every early morning

FOREWORD

The author, Gerd Michael Müller, born in Zürich in 1962, traveled as a photo-journalist to more than 50 nations and lived in seven countries, including in the underground in South Africa during apartheid. In the 80 years he was a political activist at the youth riots in Zürich. Then he was involved in pioneering Wildlife & eco projects in Southern Africa and humanitarian projects elsewhere in the world. As early as 1993, Müller reported on the global climate change and in 1999 he founded the «Tourism & Environment Forum Switzerland». Through his humanitarian missions he got to know Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and other figures of light. His book is an exciting mixture of political thriller, crazy social stories and travel reports – the highlights of his adventurous, wild nomadic life for reportage photography .

First it shoots through the multifaceted jungle face and bizarrely rugged riverbed landscapes, then it meanders another 1000 kilometers through rice-growing flatlands and finally fans out into a delta with 4000 tropical islands. The Mekong is the lifeblood of Indochina and the pulsating lifeline for seven million Laotians. What could be more natural than to explore the charms of Laos on a hotel boat and to drift downstream, contemplating the hustle and bustle of Laotian life. To slow down from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, to look calmly over the iridescent green tones of the jungle or to glide over the shining company-ment and to let the soul dangle.

A trip on the Mekong River near the Golden Triangle is still an adventure today and just as exciting as it was in the days of the first Western explorers, the Frenchmen Lagrée and Garnier, who took two years for their expedition (1866-68). They were still struggling up the river in small outrigger boats against the wild rapids. Numerous jagged rocks, huge sandbanks, rocky gorges, narrow bends and the strongly varying water level, which can rise by several meters within hours, require extreme caution and precise knowledge of all dangerous places from the ship’s captains. At night, the upper reaches of the Mekong River are closed to navigation. It would be too dangerous in the darkness on the river. These are the pitfalls in the dry season. In the rainy season, on the other hand, the river swells rapidly by up to 20 meters.

Then logs weighing tons often shoot downstream at breakneck speed. Even on our short trip, the water level rose by three meters within two days. This was due to heavy rainfall in China and the opening of a dam. No wonder the upper course of the Mekong is one of the most beautiful but also one of the wildest river upper courses in the world. Our captain manages indeed, and sometimes resembling a small miracle, even on the way back downstream in the wake of the rapids, to curve around all the dangerous cliffs and skillfully weave through the narrow passages with the jagged rocks. In the dry season, the bizarre rocky outcrops rise up to above the deck of the boat. In the rainy season, they disappear below the surface of the water.

The river trip begins in the cultural heart of Laos, in the historic center of the city of Luang Prabang, which is situated in the protection of the spur between the Mekong and its tributary Nam Khan in northern Laos at an altitude of about 300 meters and is a trading center for rice, rubber and teak wood and handicraft products made of wood, textiles and paper. Since an international airport was built here, it is also the starting point for tourists coming from Vietnam or Bankok. The number of tourists in the old royal city of Laos is manageable. Between the many backpackers mingle more and more jetsetters who want to see the quiet beauty of Luang Prabang before it gets loud and crowded as in Cambodia or Vietnam.

In 1995, Luang Prabang was declared a Unesco World Heritage Site. 32 Buddhist monasteries and all of the French colonial architecture in the city were listed and have since been restored. Restrictive urban planning is also in place to prevent violations of the unique art-historical character of the city center. Luang Prabang’s urban history is inextricably linked to the history of Laos‘ origins. The political decline of the Sukhothai kingdom in northern Thailand in 1345 and the shift of the political center in Siam to Ayyuuhaya in 1351 also accelerated the need for a political unification process east of the Mekong River. 1365 is generally cited as the founding year of Lang Chang (the Land of a Million Elephants) under Fa Ngum. As a vassal of the Khmer Empire, Fa Ngum had received the Buddha statue Phra Bang as a coronation gift from Angkor. This was venerated in Luang Prabang, which was the capital of the kingdom of Lan Chang between 1354 and 1560, as a sacred statue with a function of legitimizing the rule.

Around 1356, Luang Prabang became a place of pilgrimage for the Phra Bang Buddha statue. Under King Setthatirat, many Buddhist monasteries were built in Luang Prabang in the 16th century. In the course of the Buddhist missionary work, among others, Wat Pasman was built on the site of today’s Wat That Luang as the oldest sacred building in the city. A considerable loss of power for Luang Prabang meant the transfer of the capital to Vientiane, which King Setthatirath had arranged in 1560 out of fear of attacks from Burma. Nevertheless, Luang Prabang remained the cultural center of the country. For more than three centuries, it became a pawn in the struggle between Thai and Burmese for political supremacy between the Irrawaddy and Mekong rivers.

When Laos came into the crosshairs of the power-political rivalry between France and England around 1886, France hoped to reach southern China by sailing up the Mekong River, but the Mekong proved to be unnavigable throughout. Nevertheless, the French were interested in political control of Laos as a strategic safeguard for their colony of Vietnam. Cleverly tactical, France took advantage of the distress in which the Laotians found themselves in the face of raids by Chinese gangs in 1887 and unceremoniously declared the region of Luang Prabang a protectorate of its colony Union Indochinose (1893-1954). In contrast to Vietnam, Laos was not of economic importance to France. Until the middle of the 20th century, Laos and thus also Luang Prabang were strongly influenced by cultural and architectural influences of the colonial power France. Even before France’s devastating defeat at Điện Biên Phủ in 1954, Laos was granted political independence in 1953.

Despite the International Laos Conference in Geneva in 1962, at which the country was granted neutrality, military supplies for the Viet Cong in South Vietnam during the Indochina War passed through Laotian territory along the so-called Ho Chi Minh Trail. Heavy bombing by the U.S. Air Force was the result. The CIA inflicted death and devastation on Laos on an unbelievable scale during the Vietnam War (1965 – 1975); the Americans bombed Laos with over two million tons (fragmentation and napalm bombs as well as the nerve agent „Agent Orange“). More bombs fell on Laos than on Germany and Japan combined in World War 2. Nevertheless, the GI’s did not find the Ho Chi Mingh Trail. The peace-loving Laotians have a 200-year history of conflict with foreign aggressors. Every year, hundreds of people are seriously injured by mines. Defusing squads, mostly women, still search the ground for bombs. The city of Luang Prabang was largely spared the fighting, although units of the communist Pathet Lao organization entrenched themselves north of the city in the Pak-Ou Caves area. In 1975, communist units captured the city.

Luang Brabang is home to over 2500 monks who make pilgrimages through the streets of Luang Prabang every morning shortly after sunrise in their orange robes, taking mild offerings in their pots from the faithful and tourists. Mostly elderly women and tourists, let the procession of monks pass by kneeling and donating to each a handful of rice, some fruits, candies, a few banknotes or other things to live on. What cultural sites and religious treasures are there to discover here? First, there is the Royal Palace (Ho Kham), built between 1904 and 1909, now the National Museum, where the throne of the rulers of the Lan Chang period stand. Then the Vat Xienthong (also Wat Xieng Thong) – a temple complex on the Mekong River, built in 1560 under King Setthathirath and restored in 1960-1962. It was the only temple in the city to survive the looting of 1887 intact. The architectural style with the roof reaching almost to the ground is typical for northern Laos.

A gem is also Vat Visounarath (also called Wat Visoun or Wat Visounarath) is a temple complex located on the southeastern side of Phousi Mountain. King Visounarath founded the monastery in 1512, which was destroyed by Chinese hordes in 1887. Most of the complex was rebuilt in the 20th century. The sim (Lao term for the main building of a wat)from 1898 contains Khmer-style window columns. Inside, since 1942, there is a museum with numerous Buddah statues especially in the rain calling gesture typical of Luang Prabang (standing with overlong arms pointing down parallel to the body).

In addition, there are two other temples: That Makmo (the Watermelon Stupa) donated by Phantin Xieng, the wife of King Visounarath, in 1504, the stupa was rebuilt in 1932, with the precious grave goods transferred to the royal palace. And the Vat Sop stupa in the northeast of the old city, founded as early as 1480 as the funeral temple of King Chakkrapat. Behind Vat Sop, on the street called Thanon Vat Sop, there is a typical Lao Baan residential quarter, where you can get an impression of the everyday life of the locals. Last but not least: Mount Phousi (130 meters high, 328 steps), the topographic accent and spiritual center opposite the Royal Palace with a magnificent view of the city area, the Mekong River as well as the forested mountain landscape in the surrounding area. Then head to the night market at the foot of Phousi in Thanon Sisavangvong, the main street of the old city, handmade textiles, sou-venirs and food are offered daily between the Royal Palace and the cross street Thanon Setthathirat from 6 pm. Many of the women traders belong to the Hmong people, who are known for their high-quality weaving, embroidery and sewing.

In Laos, beyond Theravada Buddhism, there is also ancestor worship and animism, which are still widespread among the many ethnic minorities (Hmong, Khmu, Akha or Lanten) in the mountainous regions in the inadequate north bordering China and Burma. The Hmong, for example, are archaically structured opium clans with magical spirit worlds and mythical powers, who to this day believe in their spirit world, with which they have a lively connection through their opium and canabis consumption. The opium farmers live in the isolated highlands of the Golden Triangle completely self-sufficient and reject any government, as well as modern living structures to this day. They live in dark huts without electricity or heating in the most remote highland regions of Laos, as they did hundreds of years ago, and engage in skirmishes with Laotian government soldiers. But the latter are just as unable to secure the Laotian border as the Vietnamese allies, who engage in skirmishes with the Chinese. The Chinese often get the short end of the stick and are said to have three times as many casualties. The Thais also repeatedly tried to invade Laos and were repulsed by the Vietnamese. Since the generals in Hanoi made it clear to Bankok that they would advance right up to Bankok next time, there has been calm on this front.

The Hmong allied with the Americans in the Vietnam War and supplied the CIA with thousands of tons of raw opium annually for their costly war. Rumor has it that the CIA packed 150,000 tons of raw opium per year into empty ammunition crates and flew them directly to Mexico on the doorstep of the United States using Air America pilots and private charters from the Corsican mafia in Laos, which was heavily involved in the international drug trade. The CIA thus not only financed its dirty war, which cost a billion dollars a day toward its end, but also fueled the opium trade and drug consumption of quite a few U.S. citizens and Mexicans. The irony of history: The top Hmong general lived in Washington and enjoyed the protection of the U.S. government, otherwise he would have long since landed in The Hague. The Hmong exodus has resulted in over 150,000 U.S. emigrants in San Diego. Furthermore, many Hmong also live in French Guiana and are therefore Europeans with French passports.

Laos magical Mekong meander and the 4000 islands.

Afterwards, we will descend by plane from Luang Brabang to the commercial metropolis of Pakse in the south of the country, where the second part of the river journey in the Mekong Delta begins. Here the river landscape looks quite different. Wide river streams, flat land mostly overgrown with rice paddies or sand islands and here and there extensive hill ranges far away on the horizon. The trip is very leisurely and more focused on the life on board. You sunbathe on deck and read a book or listen to music and let the world just glide by. That was then the less exciting but all the more leisurely and relaxing river trip. But also here in the south there is a large temple complex called Vat Phou. However, it is a temple complex built by the Khmer. Not quite as impressive as Ankor Wat in Siam Reap, the capital of Cambodia, which I also visited and was impressed by the colossal Khmer cultural strongholds.

But in the morning we are greeted by elephants taking a dip in the Mekong River. Before they either set off on a tourist safari, silently stalking through the dense jungle along the impressive river landscape, carrying enthusiastic backpackers on their backs, or are needed for work assignments around the village. They are the strongest builders‘ helpers, replacing the crane and the tractor. Under the shouts of the Mahuds, the elephants skillfully pile up the huge logs that they had previously placed in the right position.

In Laos there are also still numerous wild elephants in the inaccessible regions of the north. To this day, between 40 and 60 new species of animals are also discovered there every year. A new species of deer and the largest spider in the world are also among the most amazing discoveries. Unfortunately, due to the destruction of the habitat of flora and fauna, a large number of animal and plant species are threatened with extinction here as well. In 1996, 68 species of mammals, birds reptiles and fish were considered endangered. However, about 14% of the territory is now protected. Forests are threatened primarily by logging, clearing for arable land, and fuel production, with about 8% of the country’s energy needs met by wood. Annual forest loss is estimated at about 300,000 hectares.

Another tourist highlight is the picturesque karst and river landscape around Vang Vien. The Boracay of Indochina, where backpackers get high on grass and opium, is halfway to Laos‘ capital Vientiane, which like Luang Brabang is known as the city of a thousand temples. Here, the sacred That Luang stupa with its chunky gold-plated tower towers above all other religious structures, while on the lowlands near Pakse, Laos‘ economic center, the intricate ruins of ancient Khmer temples can be seen at Vat Phou, the largest Khmer complex outside Cambodia.

In the lowlands of the Mekong near Pakse, where the Mekong Islands await their guests, lie the 4000 tropical islands on the lower reaches of the Mekong. On the largest of them live 30,000 Laotians, who intensively use the fertile alluvial soil for agriculture and also engage in lively fishing. Rice cultivation, fishing and agribusiness have been the most important resources of the country, from which the lowland Laotians have lived quite well. On the smallest Mekong islands and alluvial dunes, on the other hand, there is hardly room for two herons or a palm tree. The Mekong River has already reached a considerable width here and fans out into a wide delta.

So it is no wonder that the market of Pakse, the largest goods transfer point in all of Indochina is. It is unbelievable what there is to see and taste here. Gigantic the abundance and mountains of rice, vegetables, salads, spices, fruits and fine fresh Mekong fish. There are thousands of frogs jumping around in bowls, there are grilled rats and snakes, small puffer fish and all kinds of other specialties. You, dear reader, should see this with your own eyes. After a side trip to the Kuang Si waterfalls, we return to the capital of Laos, Vientianne.

Borneo 96: Stalking through the jungle with handicapped Orang Utang

Malysia/Borneo: A handicaped young orang utan at the reha station in Sepilok, Sarawak

FOREWORD

The author, Gerd Michael Müller, born in Zürich in 1962, traveled as a photo-journalist to more than 50 nations and lived in seven countries, including in the underground in South Africa during apartheid. In the 80 years he was a political activist at the youth riots in Zürich. Then he was involved in pioneering Wildlife & eco projects in Southern Africa and humanitarian projects elsewhere in the world. As early as 1993, Müller reported on the global climate change and in 1999 he founded the «Tourism & Environment Forum Switzerland». Through his humanitarian missions he got to know Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama and other figures of light. His book is an exciting mixture of political thriller, crazy social stories and travel reports – the highlights of his adventurous, wild nomadic life for reportage photography .

(please note that translation corrections are still in progress and images will follow soon)

In 1996 I made a trip to Malaysia to celebrate 50 years of independence from the British Crown and after the state celebration with all the Asian heads of state I first traveled around Malaysia by car for ten days and visited Taman Negara National Park in the rainforest before flying to Borneo and landing in Sarawak. The goal was to explore the situation of deforestation for palm oil production and the situation of the Orang Utan, whose habitat has been destroyed. At Lake Batang Ai I started the expedition into the rainforest and hired a guide with a dugout canoe to lead me to the Iban Headhunters living here. After two days of traveling from Lake Batang Ai by canoe upstream through the sea of deforested tropical tribes flowing downstream, I ended up in one such longhouse village. These longhouses are built on stilts, up to 100 meters long and have a continuous wide corridor leading to the longitudinal veranda. In the longhouse, one apartment is lined up next to the other. So that everyone knows what the other of the clan is doing. Unfortunately it was very awkward to have conversations with the headhunters about their traditions and way of life, because nobody understood English. So everything went only by observation and a „low-level“ communication. In addition, I came down with malaria, which completely laid me up. Although I had swallowed some „Lariam“ tablets, I still felt very bad. Shaken by fever cramps and checkmate, I lay around like a dead fly in the „longhouse“ of the headhunters for three days before I could go back by dugout canoe to a jungle camp that had a radio station. There I tried to make contact with my family in Switzerland via the radio link and the telephone handset held elsewhere on the radio. When at home in Switzerland the tape recorder instead of a connection came, because it was there in the middle of the night, I said only briefly that I wanted to say goodbye, because I would probably not survive the night. After that I lay down outside under the starry night sky, shaken by further bouts of fever. I wanted to die at least in the open air and not in the tiny, stuffy wooden hut in which I had been accommodated.

What happened now was unique and drove me fundamentally. Whether it was only halucinations or whether I was actually brought back from the Ascension is not clear to this day. In any case I saw purely optically already the stars with comet-like rapid speed coming towards me and felt weightlessly pulled up into the orbit and glided, so to speak, like the spaceship „Enterprise“, which jetted with light speed through the orbit, towards the starry sky. But since the stars can’t come towards me, I realized that either I had taken off like an angel and was now racing towards the sparkling firmament at the speed of light or my fevered brain was doing its antics with my astral body and the journey to the stars was only a hallunzigone vision, ulta exciting and truly enlightening. Then a scream and screech rang in my ears and I heard my daughter and her mother howling in horrified tones, but did not understand a word. „What the hell do they want up here,“ I thought for a moment, and then my little daughter’s voice occupied my mind so much that my light-speed flight to the stars abruptly lost momentum and I completed a loop back to Earth, telling myself that the time to depart had not yet come, since there were two people who needed me. So I swallowed three more „Lariam“ tablets and had now reached the dose for an elephant, as a tropical doctor told me a few days later. But after that it slowly went uphill again.

With the help of the jungle camp residents I got back on my feet, traveled on to Kota Kinabalu to the Orang Utan Rehabilitation Station in Sepilok and arrived just at the right time, because at 11:00 a.m. the feeding of the Orang Utan was taking place from a platform about two kilometers further in the forest interior. Two groups of tourists had already started walking before me on the wooden walkway that led a good two meters above the ground into the rainforest to the large visitor platform and the two feeding places in the trees behind it. As I slowly approached the scene with my telephoto lens and recognized the young orangutans on the feeding areas, as well as the adult orangutan hanging from the wire rope that was stretched between the two feeding areas, I also heard the shouts of individual visitors who wanted to persuade the large orangutan to turn around, since he was only sticking his butt out at all of us. The isolated calls were in vain. As a photographer I was also interested that the fat guy u

After that, I stayed for a while, watching the babies get their food and gobble it down and then abruptly disappear into the trees again. But I wanted to be back in the rehab station before the others after feeding and made my way back a little earlier on the walkway. As I tried to sneak past a young handicapped orangutan, with a chopped off but already healed arm, lying backwards on the jetty and blocking the passage, he grabbed me by the lower leg. What was I supposed to do? When I wanted to gently release his hand that was clutching my leg, he simply took me by the hand, that is, by the wrist, whereupon we both, the young orangutan and the still feverish and sweaty photographer walked hand in hand all the way to the station. That was a wonderful feeling. The orang utan could have taken me right up into the treetops to meet his buddies. That didn’t work, but I had a damn good approach in the rehabilitation ward, when we still arrived there hand in hand like good friends to talk to the ward manager. The report about the „endangered“ apes was well received in the Swiss media and besides the seven daily newspapers that printed the report, the „Brückenbauer“ also published the story at that time with an appeal for donations, whereupon several tens of thousands of francs were collected and donated to the Orang Utan Rehab Station in Sepilok.

The orang utan, the „forest man“ in Malay, has been threatened with extinction since the mid-1960s. Despite international species protection agreements, at that time still extremely restrictive trade agreements and the two rehabilitation stations on Semengho in Sarawak and Sepilok in Sabah on the Malaysian island of Borneo, the close relatives of Homo Sapiens are acutely endangered. Greed for tropical timber and palm oil is destroying their habitat, the primary forest. Due to the destruction of their refuges, they are now isolated in small groups. The apes have become known through the Swiss environmental and human rights activist Bruno Manser, who vehemently campaigned for the indigenous people of the rainforest, the former headhunters, and then disappeared without a trace and was possibly murdered by the „timber mafia“, to whom he was a thorn in the flesh.

Bruno Manser from Appenzell lived in Borneo from 1984 to 1990, made records of the fauna and flora of the tropical rainforest and got to know the language and culture of the Penan, a nomadic ethnic group in Borneo, and lived with them. In 1990 he had to flee to Switzerland after he was expelled by the Malaysian government and declared an „undesirable person“. A bounty of 50000 dollars was also placed on his head. In 1993, Manser participated in a fasting action and. a hunger strike in front of the Federal Parliament in Bern to protest against the import of tropical timber. In 2000, despite an entry ban and a bounty on his head, he traveled from the Indonesian part of Borneo (Kalimantan) across the green border into the Malaysian Sarawak to the Penan and was never seen again. Since then, Bruno Manser has been considered missing and was officially declared dead in 2005.

Borneo: Dramatic deforestation and species extinction accepted

What is the situation today? The habitat of the great apes has been drastically reduced and their population has not increased but has been further decimated. Genomicists at the University of Zurich have recently discovered a new species on Sumatra, the Tapanuli orangutan, whose refuge lies in the rugged mountains of the Batang Toru region in Indonesia. A shot orang utan in Raja was examined more closely and classified as a new species by scientists. However, it will also be the species that will disappear the fastest. As in Borneo, the estimated 800 primates are affected by palm oil plantations, forest clearing, urban sprawl and a dam project. And they’re not the only ones silently going extinct. Many other species are also going extinct. One million species are at risk of extinction in the coming decades. That’s the devastating conclusion of the 2019 „World Biodiversity Council“ (IPBES). Reptiles and birds are having a hard time, but more and more mammals are also becoming extinct. 540 land vertebrate species were wiped out in the 20th century. Most of them in the Asian region. Switzerland has just concluded a controversial economic agreement with Indonesia and relies in the agreement on „RSPO“ standards, which had been developed in cooperation with companies, environmental organizations and aid agencies. According to the draft regulation, certifications would be assessed against four standards. In addition to the „Round table on sustainable Palm Oil“ (RSPO), the „Standard ISCC Plus“ (International Sustainability and Carbon Certification) and the so-called „POIG“ (Palm Oil Innovation Group). But this will not stop deforestation or dam projects, and the habitat of the orang utan and many other species is doomed. An agreement with sustainability goals is a step forward, but unfortunately it does not change the fact that overexploitation continues and there are too few protected areas. The demand for palm oil has increased extremely. Accordingly, the area under cultivation grew, which was only achieved by clearing primary forest. Since 2008, the area under palm oil cultivation has increased by 0.7 million hectares per year, an area four times the size of the canton of Zurich. And the demand is expected to double by 2050. On the island of Borneo, 50 percent of deforestation is due to palm oil cultivation. In Indonesia, which is much larger, the figure is already 20 percent. While there are also positive signs of RSPO certification, the majority of farms operate on the principle of economy of scale (70 percent) and only a third are cultivated through smallholders and cooperatives. Thus, the further potential for destruction remains eminently high.

Six percent of all animal species are found on the island of Borneo. For over 4000 years, the rainforests of Borneo have been populated by indigenous peoples. Over the last 50 years, nearly half of the rainforest in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo, has been cleared. There are thousands of land conflicts of indigenous communities with large logging companies. Although there has been a convention to protect the rainforests for 30 years, it has never been ratified and implemented by the Indonesian parliament. Furthermore, it can be observed that almost all politicians are either former or still incumbent timber industrialists in Jakarta, as Norman Jiwan from the NGO „TuK“ reports. And only less than 30 of the richest Indonesian families profit from the palm oil industry. Since the rights of the indigenous peoples and their land, which has been used ecologically for centuries, are not recognized, the timber industry can do as it pleases, with the necessary papers from the government. The customers of the timber companies are also the owners of the palm oil industry, who thus earn double from the overexploitation, because only five years after the clearing of the rainforest, the first profits from the palm oil business can already be booked. The kleptocracy in Indonesia knows no borders. The rights of the indigenous peoples are mercilessly undermined, and their land is expropriated with little or no compensation. Once the forest is cleared, the government can easily declare it as inferior forest or agricultural land and lease it to the palm oil companies through licenses, and the local communities lose the rights to their land forever. The international profiteers besides the Indonesian companies are global players like „Nestle“, „Cargill“, „Unilever“, „Procter & Gamble“ and so on.

The port city of Samarinda at the mouth of the Mahakam River, is ideally located to ship the greenbe Gld overseas. The local sawmill in Samarinda and the logging company are „FSC“ certified. Many seek and receive the „FSC“ certifications even though they are ruthlessly expanding their business with land grabs on indigenous lands. Therefore, the certifications cannot be believed. It is pure eyewash to trust them. Because the controllers of so-called certification labels are private companies that want to secure the next orders by certifying as much as possible and without hesitation, says the Austrian „Greenpeace spokeswoman“ Ursula Bittner. „One of the biggest problems with the controls is the players in the business. The more lax the controls are, the more orders flow to the controllers.“ This leads to few and insufficient controls, to intransparency, which hardly allow a real origin traceability, „Greenpeace“ complains. The decisions are oriented towards the industry and corrupt politics. Lukas Straumann of the Bruno Manser Fund in Basel also confirms that corruption is widespread in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Tropical rainforest plywood also made its way to the Tokyo Olympics and was used in the stadiums to form the concrete foundations via „Sumitomo Forestry“, one of the main timber suppliers for the Olympics, according to Hanna Heineken, a financial expert with Rainforest Action Network. The Japanese government subsequently had to admit that tropical rainforest timber was used in all Olympic stadiums, coming from shady sources and companies involved in land conflicts, human rights abuses, tax fraud, licensing fraud and many other economic crimes. Well, and where is the headquarters of the Olympic community?

In Switzerland, in Lausanne. One wonders how far the responsibility of the Olympic Committee extends? Obviously nowhere! The „Olympic Committee“ obviously didn’t give a damn about sustainable games and should be held accountable from now on. Unfortunately, it is also the case that the Swiss government has concluded an agreement with the Indonesian government that is praised as sustainable and, like so many paper tigers, is not worth a cent. It only serves to calm down overly believing consumers, the justification by the exploiters and profiteers in banking and economic circles, but never for the protection of the rainforest or the actual observance of indigenous human rights. This is also the case in the Malaysian part of Borneo. The Sarawak Taib Mahmud family has interests in over 400 companies and has moved its assets to dozens of countries. According to „Interpol“, 150 million US dollars were laundered annually by the Taib Mahmud family through an international banking network. The „Deutsche Bank“ was very involved in this. Malay Prime Minister Najib Rasak was also proven in the „1MbD Scandal“ to have received $681 million from a Singaporean bank that forked out in connection with the immense money laundering in the „1MbD Fund.“

Kapitelübersicht der Auszüge aus dem noch unveröffentlichten Buch «DAS PENDEL SCHLÄGT ZURÜCK! des Zürcher Fotojournalisten Gerd Michael Müller

VORWORT:

Das Buch des Zürcher Foto-Journalisten Gerd Michael Müller nimmt Sie ab den wilden 80er Jahren mit auf eine spannende Zeitreise durch 30 Länder und 40 Jahre Zeitgeschichte mit Fokus auf mehrere politische und ökologische Vorgänge in Krisenregionen rund um den Globus. Er beleuchtet das Schicksal indigener Völker, zeigt die Zerstörung ihres Lebensraumes auf, rückt ökologische Aspekte und menschenliche Schicksale in den Vordergrund, analysiert scharfsichtig und gut informiert die politischen Transforma-tionsprozesse. Müller prangert den masslosen Konsum und die gnadenlose Ausbeutung der Ressourcen an, zeigt die Auswirkungen wirtschaftlicher, gesellschaftlicher und politischer Prozesse auf und skizziert Ansätze zur Bewältigung des Klimawandels. Pointiert hintergründig, spannend und erhellend. Eine Mischung aus globalem Polit-Thrillern, gehobener Reiseliteratur, gespickt mit sozialkritischen und abenteuerlichen Geschichten sowie persönlicher Essays – den Highlights und der Essenz seines abenteuerlich wilden Nomaden-Lebens für die Reportage-Fotografie. Nach der Lektüre dieses Buchs zählen Sie zu den kulturell, ökologisch sowie politisch versierten Globetrotter

Die Jugendunruhen und Politskandale zu Beginn der 80er Jahre     
Im Strudel Schweizer Politskandale 

Stationär im Sengegal, in Polen und in London                                                         

Südafrika: Im Kampf gegen die Apartheid im Untergrund    

Apartheid: Das rabenschwarze Kapitel der Schweiz             

1994: Mandelas Besuch in der Schweiz         

 93/94: IKRK-Einsätze im «ANC-IFP»-Bürgerkrieg 

2011: Wie Gadaffis Milliarden in den Händen Zumas untergetaucht sind 

2017: Gupta-Leaks: Wie indische Kleptokraten dank Zuma Südafrika plünderte                               

Botswana: MIt den Khoi-San durch das Okavango-Delta streifen

Die Buschmänner, deren Leben bald Geschichte ist

Kenya 2008: IKRK-Einsatz nach ethnischen Unruhen im Rift Valley

Namibia 2013: Entwicklungshilfe, HIV-Schulen und im Reich der Geparde

Das dunkle Kapitel Deutschlands: Völkermord, Sklaverei, Landraub

Grenada 94: Zum Frühstück auf dem Flugzeugträger US John Rodgers

1993: Lebenslust & Protest zu Calypsoklängen in London und Trinidad

Stets sozial engagiert und ökologisch interveniert

Soziales und politisches Engagement in der Schweiz

Mexico: Osterprozessionen und Indioaufstände

Kolumbien: Höllentrip in im Dienste der Swissair 

Highlights in Brasilien

Sri Lanka 92: Die Perle des Orients nach dem Bürgerkrieg

Malediven 93: Die ersten Anzeichen des Klimawandels

Borneo 96: Spaziergang mit handicapierten Orang Utans

Philippines 95: Auf den Spuren der Geistheiler, die Körper mit den Händen öffnen

1996: Bali, Lombok und die Gili-Inseln  

2013: Abenteuerliche Flussreise im Norden Laos

Magische Mekong Cruise durch die Mäander der 4000 Inseln

Mauritius: Symphonie in Türkis und Weiss mit den weltbesten Spa-Resorts

Komoren: Die Parfüminseln tauchen aus der Versenkung empor

Der Klimawandel das Tourismus & Umwelt Forum Schweiz

Artensterben & Pandemien: Werden wir das überleben?

Endzeit: Das sechste Massensterbern hat begonnen, gehen wir mit unter?

Die Dürren in Europa sind hausgemachte EU-Agrarsubventionspolitik

Chronologie guter Absichten und jahrzehntelangem Versagens      

Schmetterlingseffekte: Hedge Fonds potenzieren Kriege und den Klimawandel

Ohne radikalen Paradigmenwechsel schaufeln wir unser eigenes Grab

Aegypten 2004: Bei den Beduinen im Sinai

Libanon 2006: In Beirut im Palästinenser-Flüchtlingscamp

Irans Drogenpolitik: Scheinheilige Repression und kafkaeske Bevormundung

Ein Blick hinter die Kulissen der iranischen Botschaft in Bern

Die fantastischen Naturparadiese und die dreckige Kohleindustrie

Opalsucher in Coober Pedy: «Die Hoffnung lebt im Untergrund»

Südsee-Highlights: Bora Bora, Huhine, Moorea, Tetiaroa 

Print-Publikationsübersicht 

Auszug aus der noch unveröffentlichten Autobiografie «DAS PENDEL SCHLÄGT ZURÜCK! – TRANSFORMATIONSPROZESSE POLITISCHER UND ÖKOLOGISCHER NATUR» des Zürcher Fotojournalisten Gerd Michael Müller

Botswana: Besuch bei den Bushmänner in der Kalahari

Auszug aus dem noch unveröffentlichten Buch «POLITISCHE & ÖKOLOGISCHE METAMORPHOSEN» des Zürcher Fotojournalisten Gerd Michael Müller

Hier sehen wir die San beim Feuer machen. Es sind die Hüter der heiligen Felsen Tsodillo Hills mit den Felsmalerein.

1986 nach dem ersten Aufenthalt in Südafrika mit drei Schweizer Reiseleiter aus London, brach ich zu einer Expedition ins Okavango Delta im Nachbarstaat Botswana auf. Mittlerweile hatten wir unsere Expedition ins Okavango Delta im Nachbarstaat Botswana aufgegleist und waren bereit, mit zwei Landrovern los zu fahren. Als drei weitere KollegInnen aus London eintrafen, ging es los auf eine aussergewöhnlich abenteuerliche Reise. Erst fuhren wir von Johannesburg nördlich zum Grenzfluss, der schon eine echte Herausforderung zu Überquerung darstellte und nur dank zwei Fahrzeugen und Seilwinden zu bewerkstelligen war. Dann ging es durch die Madikgadikdadi Salt Panels nach Maun und von dort über Kasane weiter zur «3rd Bridge», dann zum Savuti Channel im Moremi Game Reserve und schliesslich gelangten wir bei den Victoria-Fällen an. Das hört sich jetzt ganz einfach an, war aber ein höllisch heisser Trip mit vielen Lehrstücken beim Überleben in der afrikanischen Wildnis.

Zum Glück war Johann, ein erfahrener und verlässlicher südafrikanischer Safari-Guide, der uns in die Gefahren und Bush-Erlebnisse einführte. Es war beängstigend in einem kleinen Zelt zu schlafen und ein paar Elefanten vor bzw. über einem stehen zu haben und die Aeste herunter prasselten, als sie über uns in den Kronen frassen. Erst wollten wir nicht im, auf oder unter den Landrovern schlafen und umstellten unser Zelt mit den Camping Stühlen zur dilettantischen Abwehr und als ein Art akustisches Alarmsignal vor dem Gefressen werden. Zum Glück hatte der Guide ein gutes Ohr und den sechsten Spürsinn eingeschaltet und warnte uns eines Nachts mit den Worten. „Die Löwen kommen, kommt schnell her und klettert aufs Dach rauf.“ Also hüpften wir wie die Gazellen mit Riesenschritten zu den Fahrzeugen und sprangen geschmeidig hoch. Dann kam das Löwengebrüll auch schon näher und ein beachtliches Rudel strich um unsere Fahrzeuge rum. Da wäre es im Zelt schon sehr ungemütlich geworden.

Es gibt nicht viel zu tun für ältere San Frauen. Erst wenn die Jäger zurück kommen sind sie beschäftigt

In einer anderen Nacht wachte ich auf und musste das viele Bier ausspülen, dass wir jeden Abend soffen. Also suchte ich mit der Taschenlampe aus dem Zeltschlitz heraus die Umgebung nach Augen ab, die im Schein der Taschenlampe aufblitzen würden. Noch etwas benommen vom Alkohol und der nächtlichen Hitze über 40 Grad sah ich nichts und wollte schon raus. Da lief das Flusspferd, das direkt vor dem Eingang stand, ein paar Schritte weiter und nun sah ich mehr von der nächtlichen Umgebung, blieb aber infolge des tierischen Nachbars vorsichtshalber geräuschlos im Zelt, denn Flusspferde sind die Todesursache Nummer eins in Botswana.

Und als wir nach einer Woche staubtrockener Tour bei über 40 Grad halb verdurstet endlich bei «3rd Bridge», ankamen, gab es kein Halten mehr, als wir Wasser sahen. Alle stürzten sich in den Hippo- und Krokodil-Pool rein, als gäbe es keine Gefahr. Wir waren ziemlich „lucky“. Ein anderes Mal musste ich beim Durchstreifen des Bush einen herannahenden Löwen mit Steinwürfen, Staub aufwirbeln und wütendem Fauchen in die Flucht schlagen. Was den Ausschlag für seinen majestätischen Rückzug gab, erfuhr ich nie.

Ja und dann stiessen wir auf Willy Zingg, einen ehemaligen Schweizer Militärpiloten, der hier in Botswana hängen blieb und zu einer Legende heran wuchs. Nicht nur seine furchtlosen Alligator-Beutezeuge auch seine tollkühne Flugakrobatik war weit herum bekannt. Er war ein Haudegen wie er im Bilderbuch steht. Wir lernten ihn unter dramatischen Umständen kennen. Wir fuhren gerade auf einen der selten zu sehenden Safari-Trupps zu und sahen, dass ein mächtiger Elefant den Landrover in die Mangel genommen hatte und kräftig durchrüttelte.

Später erfuhren wir, dass es ihm dabei um die Orangen gegangen war. Als nächstes sahen wir einen Mann zum anderen Fahrzeug spurten, der dann durchstartete und von hinten in den Elefanten rein fuhr. Das wirkte. Der Elefant bog mit lautem Trompengeheul links ab, trampelte dabei aber versehentlich über ein Zelt, in dem eine Frau lag und die dann an der Hüfte verletzt wurde. Ja, solche oder ähnlich heisse Situationen gab es einige auf diesem Trip. Wir blieben gottseidank alle verschont. Der Wahnsinn.

Dieser junge San sieht bei der Schmuckherstellung mit Knochenteilen zu. Gerd M. Müller/GMC

Eine weitere abenteuerliche Situation ergab sich, als Willy Zingg seine Landepiste bei den Tsodillo-Hills, den heiligen Bergen der San, der auch als Bushmänner bekannten Uhreinwohner der Kalahari, fertiggestellt hatte und mit dem San-Oberhaupt einen Rundflug machen wollte. Da bei der Landung das Fahrwerk nicht raus klappen wollte, musste der erfahrene Kampfpilot einen Looping drehen und das Flugzeug überrollen, um dank der Fliehkraft das verklemmte Fahrwerk wieder auszufahren. Das gelang und der erste San, der in den Himmel abhob, war zwar etwas „trümmlig“ aber hell begeistert.

Botswana: Die Wächterinnen der heiligen Tsodillo Hills

In der Zentral-Kalahari leben damals rund 16‘000 Buschmänner und im gesamten südlichen Afrika schätzt man ihre Zahl auf rund 100‘000. Sie sind meisterhafte Spurenleser, berüchtigte Jäger, begnadete Bogenschützen – und wahre Ökologen. Sie leben nach dem Eros-Prinzip, das alles mit allem verbindet: «Alles gehört Mutter Natur und Mutter Erde. Keiner be-sitzt etwas. Alles wird geteilt», erklärt mir der junge San Suruka die Welt-anschauung der San am Fusse der Tsodillo-Hills mit den uralten Fels-zeichnungen. Um dies zu verdeutlichen, erzählen uns die kleinwüchsigen, zähen Menschen mit den kurzen, pechschwarzen Locken und pfirsich-farbenen Hauttönen von der Jagd. Sie bestreichen den Schaft ihrer Pfeile mit einem Gift, das sie aus Raupen gewinnen. Die Dosis des Gifts wird je nach Tier, das erlegt wird, exakt gewählt. Nichts wird verschwendet – nicht einmal ein Tropfen Giftes. Die San haben gelernt, auch in den unwirtlichsten Gegen-den des Kontinents zu überleben. Diese Anpassungsfähigkeit wurde aus der Not geboren, wie uns Suruka weiter erzählt: „Wir Buschmänner kennen kein Privat-eigentum, weder Zäune noch Grenzen. Unser Lebensrhythmus ist auf die Wanderung der Tiere und Gezeiten abgestimmt. Wir leben nach dem Prinzip, dass die Natur allen Menschen gehört und jeder sich nur das nehmen soll, was er braucht. Dies hatte zur Folge, dass man unser Volk während Jahrhunderten wie Freiwild gejagt, vertrieben und getötet hat.“ Täter waren sowohl andere afrikanische Stämme als auch die europäischen Kolonialherren unter ihnen die Deutschen. Ein weiteres mystisches Erlebnis hatte ich dann beim Aufstieg zu den über 6000 Jahre alten Felszeichnungen in den zerklüfteten Felsen. Suruka versuchte mir in seiner Klicklaut-Sprache irgendetwas zu sagen, so in der Art, dass wir auf Wächter stossen werden, vor denen ich mich aber nicht fürchten sollte. Die Wächter waren wohl die beiden Klapper-schlangen, die vor unseren Augen quer von einem Felsvorsprung auf den anderen rüber glitten und zwar gleichzeitig von zwei Seiten. Wäre ich allein gewesen, wäre ich wohl nicht weitergegangen. Mit Suruka fühlte ich mich sicher und durfte mit ihm die magischen, uralten Felsmalereien bestaunen. Gut 12 Jahre später sah ich dann einen Film auf dem britischen TV-Sender «BBC» bei dem Suruka wieder auftauchte und die Filmcrew eben zu den Tsodillo-Hills führte, wie mich damals.

Das Okavango-Delta ist ein einzigartig schillerndes ja geradezu überirdisches Naturparadies und ein Tierreich, solange der Mensch aussen vorbleibt. Dies ist der Regierung in Botswana, einem der reichsten afrikani-schen Ländern, dank den reichhaltigen Diamentenvorkommen gut gelungen. Sie hat die Vorteile des nachhaltigen Safari-Tourismus früh erkannt und gefördert und viele grosse Gebiete unter Schutz gestellt. Ich bin im Laufe der 90er Jahre mehrfach ins Okavango-Delta gereist, dann aber schon eher auf luxuriöse Art und Weise mit Besuchen in den teuersten Luxus-Lodges von «Wilderness Safari». Nun, da man die Elefanten immer noch nicht ausreichend vor Wilderern schützen kann, kommt eine neue Seuche infolge des Klimawandels auf die Elefanten zu.  

Allein 2020 waren in Botswana im Okavango Delta beim Moremi Game Reserve 330 tote Tiere gezählt worden und das rätselhafte Massensterben setzt sich auch 2021 fort. Damals hatten die Behörden Cyanobakterien, auch Blaualgen als mögliche Todesursache ausgemacht. Der Internationale Tiersachutz Fonds (IFAW) kommt zum Schluss, dass das Massensterben mit einem beschränkten Zugang zu Frischwasser haben und deren Lebensräume u.a. durch die Viehwirtschaft immer mehr eingeengt werden. Zudem ist das Ansteigen der Cyanobakterien auf den Klimawandel zurückzuführen.

Der unsäglichen Wilderung könnte wohl nur Einhalt geboten werden, wenn China den Import stoppen und die Einfuhrbeschränkungen drastisch kontrollieren und durchsetzen würde. Warum also sollte die internationale Staatengemeinschaft und die Länder Afrikas nicht den Hauptverursacher für das Schlachten zur Verantwortung ziehen und China dazu zwingen, gegen den Elefenbeinhandel rigoros vorzugehen. China wäre mit all ihren Überwachungsmassnahmen in der Lage einen signifikaten Beitrag zur Lösung des Problems beizutragen.

Auszug aus dem unveröffentlichten Buch Highlights of a wildlife

Zur Publikationsübersicht nach Ländern

IN EIGENER SACHE: IHR BEITRAG AN HUMANITAERE UND OEKO-PROJEKTE

Geschätzte Leserin, werter Leser

Der Autor unterstützt noch immer zahlreiche Projekte. Infolge der COVID-19 Pandemie ist es aber für den Autor selbst für und zahlreiche Projekte schwieriger geworden. Die Situation hat sich verschärft. Für Ihre Spende, die einem der im Buch genannten Projekte zufliesst, bedanke ich mich.

Falls Sie einen Beitrag spenden wollen, melden Sie sich bitte per Mail bei mir gmc1(at) gmx.ch.

Vielen Dank im Namen der Empfänger/innen.

Besuch bei den Buschmännern im Okavango Delta

Auszug aus dem noch unveröffentlichten Buch «DAS PENDEL SCHLÄGT ZURÜCKPOLITISCHE & ÖKOLOGISCHE METAMORPHOSEN» des Zürcher Fotojournalisten Gerd Michael Müller

VORWORT

Das Buch des Zürcher Foto-Journalisten Gerd Michael Müller nimmt Sie ab den wilden 80er Jahren mit auf eine spannende Zeitreise durch 30 Länder und 40 Jahre Zeitgeschichte mit Fokus auf mehrere politische und ökologische Vorgänge in Krisenregionen rund um den Globus. Er beleuchtet das Schicksal indigener Völker, zeigt die Zerstörung ihres Lebensraumes auf, rückt ökologische Aspekte und menschenliche Schicksale in den Vordergrund, analysiert scharfsichtig und gut informiert die politischen Transformationsprozesse. Müller prangert den masslosen Konsum und die gnadenlose Ausbeutung der Ressourcen an, zeigt die Auswirkungen wirtschaftlicher, gesellschaftlicher und politischer Prozesse auf und skizziert Ansätze zur Bewältigung des Klimawandels. Pointiert hintergründig, spannend und erhellend. Eine Mischung aus globalem Polit-Thrillern, gehobener Reiseliteratur, gespickt mit sozialkritischen und abenteuerlichen Geschichten sowie persönlicher Essays – den Highlights und der Essenz seines abenteuerlich wilden Nomaden-Lebens für die Reportage-Fotografie. Nach der Lektüre dieses Buchs zählen Sie zu den kulturell, ökologisch sowie politisch versierten Globetrotter.

Unser Aufenthalt in Südafrika neigte sich dem Ende zu, denn mittlerweile hatten wir drei Schweizer Reiseleiter auch unsere Expedition ins Okavango Delta im Nachbarstaat Botswana aufgegleist und waren bereit, mit zwei Landrovern los zu fahren. Als drei weitere Kollegen aus London eintrafen, ging es los auf eine aussergewöhnlich abenteuerliche Reise. Erst fuhren wir von Johannesburg nördlich zum Grenzfluss, der schon eine echte Herausforderung zu Ueberquerung darstellte und nur dank zwei Fahrzeugen und Seilwinden zu bewerkstelligen war. Dann ging es durch die Madikgadikdadi Salt Panels nach Maun und von dort über Kasane weiter zur «3rd Bridge», dann zum Savuti Channel im Moremi Game Reserve und schliesslich gelangten wir bei den Victoria-Fällen an. Das hört sich jetzt ganz einfach an, war aber ein höllisch heisser Trip mit vielen Lehrstücken beim Ueberleben in der afrikanischen Wildnis.

Zum Glück war Johann, ein erfahrener und verlässlicher südafrikanischer Safari-Guide, der uns in die Gefahren und Bush-Erlebnisse einführte. Es war beängstigend in einem kleinen Zelt zu schlafen und ein paar Elefanten vor bzw. über einem stehen zu haben und die Aeste herunter prasselten, als sie über uns in den Kronen frassen.

Der Fotojournalist zu Fuss unterwegs in der Central Kalahari, wo er auch auf grössere Elefantenherden stösst.

Zum Glück hatte unser Guide ein gutes Ohr und den sechsten Spürsinn eingeschaltet und warnte uns eines Nachts mit den Worten. „Die Löwen sind da, kommt schnell her und klettert aufs Dach rauf.“ Also hüpften wir flink wie die Gazellen mit Riesensprüngen zu den Fahrzeugen und dort angekommen geschmeidig hoch und siehe da, schon ertönte das laute Löwengebrüll und ein beachtliches Rudel strich als gleich um unsere Fahrzeuge herum. Da wäre es im Zelt höchst ungemütlich geworden, denn die Raubtiere haben schliesslich von Natur aus einen riesen Hunger und müssen auch noch ihre Babies füttern. In einer anderen Nacht wachte ich auf und musste das viele Bier ausspülen, das wir jeden Abend tranken.

Also suchte ich mit der Taschenlampe aus dem Zeltschlitz heraus die Umgebung nach reflektierenden Augen ab, die im Schein der Taschenlampe aufblitzen würden. Noch etwas benommen vom Alkohol und der nächtlichen Hitze über 40 Grad sah ich nichts dergleichen und wollte schon raus, da lief ein Flusspferd, das direkt keine zwei Meter vor dem Zelteingang stand und graste, ein paar Schritte weiter und nun sah ich bedeutend mehr von der nächtlichen Umgebung, blieb aber infolge des tierischen Nachbarn vorsichtshalber geräuschlos im Zelt liegen, denn Flusspferde sind die Todesursache Nummer 1 in Botswana.

Endlich eine kleine Umgebungsbeschreibung mit Hinweisen, wo es lang geht

Als wir nach einer Woche staubtrockener Tour bei über 40 Grad (nachts) halb verdurstet endlich bei 3rd Bridge, ankamen, gab es kein Halten mehr, als wir das köstliche Rinsal endlich sahen. Alle stürzten sich wie übermütige Kinder in den Hippo- und Krokodil-Pool rein und planschten fröhlich rum, als gäbe es keine Gefahren. Wir waren damals ziemlich „lucky“, denn normalerweise wimmelt es hier ja von Krokodilen, Flusspferden und anderen gefrässigen Wildtieren. Jahre später zu Gast bei den feudalen Wildlife-Lodges kurvte jeweils ein Motorboot im Kreis um die Schwimmer rum, damit gewiss kein Krokodil oder Hippo in der Nähe der Badenden Gäste tummelt und Fressgelüste entwickelte. Ein anderes Mal musste ich beim Durchstreifen des Bushs einen herannahenden Löwen mit Steinwürfen, Staub aufwirbelnd und wütendem Fauchen sowie gottverdammten Flüchen in die Flucht schlagen. Was genau den Ausschlag für seinen majestätischen Rückzug gab, erfuhr ich nie. Der Puls blieb jedenfalls noch lange in Rekordhöhe. Doch fiel mir ein Stein vom flatternden Herzen.b, erfuhr ich nie.

Dann stiessen wir auf Willy Zingg, einen ehemaligen Schweizer Militärpiloten, der hier in Botswana hängen blieb und zu einer Legende heran wuchs. Nicht nur seine furchtlosen Alligator-Beutezeuge auch seine tollkühne Flugakrobatik war weit herum bekannt war. Er war ein Haudegen wie er im Bilderbuch steht. Wir lernten ihn damals unter höchst dramatischen Umständen kennen. Gerade fuhren wir auf einen der selten anzutreffenden Safari-Trupp im menschenleeren Okavango Delta zu und sahen, zu unserem Schrecken, dass ein mächtiger Elefant den einen Landrover in die Mangel genommen hatte und mit seinem Rüssel kräftig durchrüttelte.

Später erfuhren wir von Willy, dass es dem Elefanten dabei um die Orangen gegangen war. Als nächstes sahen wir einen Mann zum anderen Fahrzeug spurten, der mit diesem dann kurzerhand durchstartete und von hinten in das Hinterteil des Elefanten rein fuhr. Das wirkte bestens! Der Elefant bog mit lautem Trompetengeheul links ab, trampelte dabei aber versehentlich über ein Zelt, in dem eine Frau lag und die er dann bei seiner Flucht an der Hüfte schwer verletzt. Ja, solche oder ähnlich heisse Situationen gab es einige auf diesem abenteurlichen Trip.

Mit den Bushmännern durch die Wildnis der Zentral-Kalahari streifend

Doch wir blieben gottseidank alle verschont. Der helle Wahnsinn! Eine weitere abenteuerliche Situation ergab sich, als besagter Schweizer Safari-Pionier seine Landepiste bei den Tsodillo-Hills, den heiligen Bergen der Khoi-San, die auch als Bushmänner bekannten Ureinwohner der Kalahari fertiggestellt hatte und mit dem San-Oberhaupt einen Rundflug machen wollte. Da bei der Landung das Fahrwerk nicht raus klappen wollte, musste der erfahrene Kampfpilot einen tollkühnen Looping drehen und das Flugzeug überrollen, um dank der Fliehkraft das verklemmte Fahrwerk wieder auszufahren. Das gelang ihm und der erste Bushman, der in den Himmel abhob, war danach zwar etwas aus dem irdischen Gleichgewicht gebracht aber dennoch hell begeistert. Das muss für den Khoi-San in etwa so gewesen sein, wie wenn wir plötzlich mit einer Mondrakete durchstarten würden.

In der Zentral-Kalahari leben damals rund 16‘000 Buschmänner und im gesamten südlichen Afrika schätzt man ihre Zahl auf rund 100‘000. Sie sind meisterhafte Spurenleser, berüchtigte Jäger, begnadete Bogenschützen – und wahre Ökologen. Sie leben nach dem Eros-Prinzip, das alles mit allem verbindet: «Alles gehört Mutter Natur und Mutter Erde. Keiner besitzt etwas. Alles wird geteilt», erklärt mir der junge Khoi-San Suruka die Weltanschauung der San am Fusse der Tsodillo-Hills, der vier heiligen, flüsternden Hügel mit den uralten Felszeichnungen, die ältesten von ihnen sollen über 30‘000 Jahre alt sein, womit wir vermutlich bei der Wiege der menschlichen Zivilisation angelangt wären. Und dann gibt es noch die Höhle der steinernen Pythonschlange, die nach Angaben von Wissenschaftlern vor rund 70‘000 Jahren bearbeitet wurde.

In der Regenzeit hat es hier viel Wasser, sodass der Landrover im Sumpf wäre.

Um dies zu verdeutlichen, erzählen uns die kleinwüchsigen, zähen Menschen mit den kurzen, pechschwarzen Locken und pfirsichfarbenen Hauttönen von der Jagd. Sie bestreichen den Schaft ihrer Pfeile mit einem Gift, das sie aus Raupen gewinnen. Die Dosis des Gifts wird je nach Tier, das erlegt wird, exakt gewählt. Nichts wird verschwendet – nicht einmal ein Tropfen Gift.

Um ihre naturverbundenheit zu verdeutlichen, erzählen uns die kleinwüchsigen, zähen Menschen mit den kurzen, pechschwarzen Locken und pfirsichfarbenen Hauttönen von der Jagd. Sie bestreichen den Schaft ihrer Pfeile mit einem Gift, das sie aus Raupen gewinnen. Die Dosis des Gifts wird je nach Tier, das erlegt wird, exakt gewählt. Nichts wird verschwendet – nicht einmal ein Tropfen des Giftes. So ist das mit allen anderen Dingen ebenso, die Bushmänner und ihre Frauen nehmen nur das, was sie gerade zum überleben brauchen. Graben sie eine Frucht oder ein Gemüste aus dem Boden, schneiden sie sie unten ab und lassen den Rest mit den Wurzeln in der Erde, damit wieder neue Triebe wachsen können.

Die San haben gelernt, auch in den unwirtlichsten und trockensten Regionen der Kalahari zu überleben. Diese Anpassungsfähigkeit wurde aus der Not geboren, wie uns Suruka weiter erzählt: „Als uns die Buren und andere weisse Herren bedrohten, vertrieben und töteten mussten wir in Gebiete ohne Wasser fliehen. Also füllten wir Strausseneier mit Wasser und vergruben sie im Wüstensand. So konnten wir auch da überleben.

Zudem kennen wir Buschmänner kein Privateigentum, weder Zäune noch Grenzen. Unser Lebensrhythmus ist auf die Wanderung der Tiere und die Gezeiten abgestimmt und wir leben nach dem Prinzip, dass die Natur allen Menschen gehört und jeder sich nur das nehmen soll, was er braucht. Doch hat man unser Volk während Jahrhunderten wie Freiwild gejagt, vertrieben und getötet. Täter waren sowohl andere afrikanische Stämme als auch die europäischen Kolonialherren unter ihnen die Deutschen.

Im Nordwesten der Kalahari liegt also der grosse Schatz der Khoi-San, sozusagen der „Louvre der Bushmen-Kultur“. Heute führt eine Strasse von Shakawe nach Tsodillo, das Sir Laurence van der Post in seinem Bestseller „Die verloren Welt der Kalahari“ so glänzend beschrieb. Rund um den steil aufragenden Pyramidenhügel „Male“ sind über 6000 Jahre alte Felsmalereien der Buschmänner zu sehen. Seit Juni 2002 zählt diese Kulturstätte zu den UNESCO Weltkulturerben. Die Nebenhügel werden von den San „Female“, „Child“ und „Grandschild“ genannt. Ein wahrlich mystisches Erlebnis hatte ich dann beim Aufstieg zu den uralten Felszeichnungen in den zerklüfteten Felsen. Suruka versuchte mir in seiner Klicklaut-Sprache irgend etwas zu sagen, so in der Art, dass wir auf Wächter stossen würden, vor denen ich mich aber nicht fürchten sollte. Die Wächter waren wohl die beiden Klapperschlangen, die vor unseren Augen quer von einem Felsvorsprung auf den anderen rüber glitten und zwar gleichzeitig von zwei Seiten. Wäre ich allein gewesen, wäre ich wohl nicht weitergegangen. Mit Suruka fühlte ich mich sicher und durfte mit ihm die magischen, uralten Felsmalereien bestaunen. 12 Jahre später sah ich einen Film auf dem britischen TV-Sender «BBC» bei dem Suruka wieder auftauchte und die Filmcrew eben zu den Tsodillo-Hills führte, wie mich damals.

Das Okavango-Delta ist ein einzigartig schillerndes ja geradezu überirdisches Naturparadies und ein Tierreich, solange der Mensch aussen vorbleibt. Dies ist der Regierung in Botswana, einem der reichsten afrikanischen Ländern, dank den reichhaltigen Diamentenvorkommen gut gelungen. Sie hat die Vorteile des nachhaltigen Safari-Tourismus früh erkannt und gefördert und viele grosse Gebiete unter Schutz gestellt. Ich bin im Laufe der 90er Jahre mehrfach ins Okavango-Delta gereist, dann aber schon eher auf luxuriöse Art und Weise mit Besuchen in den teuersten Luxus-Lodges von «Wilderness Safari».

Auf der Pirschfahrt mit dem M’koros, dem Einbaum-Boot, in dem die Tswanas auch zwei ausgewachsene Rinder transportieren können, staken wir durchs dichte Schilf an den Flusspferden, Wasserbüffel und Krokodilen vorbei zum Jao Camp. Es ist, als würde man auf einem Seerosenblatt über die spiegelglatte Wasseroberfläche durch das dichte Schilf gleiten, da der Bootsrand der M’koros nur wenige Zentimeter aus dem Wasser ragt. Ein mulmiges Gefühl. Öffnet ein Hippo sein riesiges Maul, könnte man mit dem M’koros wie in einen Tunnel hineinfahren. Doch blieb uns dieses Schicksal dank der Vorsicht des aufmerksamen und kundigen Stakers erspart.

Als der Autor vor 1986 das erste Mal im Okavango-Delta war, war dieses komplett ausgetrocknet und hatte nur wenige Wasserlöcher. Mit den traditionellen Fortbewegungsmitteln den M’koros kam man nicht sehr weit. Beim zweiten Besuch war es gerade umgekehrt. Seit 46 Jahren wurde das Delta in der Senke Afrikas nicht mehr so stark geflutet. Ein Fortkommen mit 4×4 Fahrzeugen war in vielen Teilen des Okavango Deltas rund um Moremi und Chief Island unmöglich. Was war passiert? Jao Game Ranger Cedric Samotanzi kennt die Antwort: „Nach tektonischen Verschiebungen kam zum ersten Mal das Wasser auch wieder durch das unterirdische Geflecht in den Lynanti und Savuti-Channel zurück“, so erklärte und Cederic das Phänomen Wüste unter Wasser.

Statt auf ausgetrockneten und staubigen Sandpisten zwischen kargem Buschwerk herumzukurven und nach Wildtieren zu spähen, fuhr der Landrover meilenweit auf den halbwegs erkennbaren Sandpisten durch riesige Seen, das Wasser immer bis zur Tür hochquellend und immer einer leichten Strömung ausgesetzt. Der erfahrene Game Ranger lotete alle Grenzen des Machbaren mit seinem 4×4 aus, bevor wir endgültig aufgeben und aufs M’koro umsteigen mussten. Bei einem steckengebliebenen Fahrzeug zurück zum Camp zu schwimmen, wäre keine gute Alternative gewesen. Gewiss hätte man bald im Schlund eines Nilpferdes oder Krokodiles geendet.

Botswana bietet mit seiner natürlichen Umwelt und unberührten Natur sowie dank den zahlreichen geschützten Reservaten die höchste Wildlife-Konzentration im südlichen Afrika und daher auch spektakuläre Wildtierbeobachtungen. Botswanas grösster Schatz sind die riesigen Diamantenvorkommen, die das Land zu einem der reichsten afrikanischen Ländern machen. „Bereits seit 1990 geniesst der Schutz von Fauna und Flora und die Entwicklung eines ökologisch orientierten nachhaltigen Tourismus höchste Priorität in Botswana, sagte die damalige Direktorin des Tourismusministeriums in Botswana Tlhabolongo Ndzinge. Nahezu Zweifünftel des Landes sind geschützte Naturflächen, die zu den grössten ökologischen Ressourcen der Welt zählen. Botswana hat «Global Codes of Ethics for Tourism» der Welthandelsorganisation «WTO», der den Rahmen für verantwortliche und nachhaltige Entwicklung zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts setzten. Dem fortschreitenden Aufbau von Öko- und Ethnotourismus kommt der schonenden Entwicklung des ländlichen Raums besondere Bedeutung zu: So sind mehr als ein Drittel der in Botswana laufenden 90 Programme im Rahmen der „Community based Developpment projects“ angesiedelt.

Doch das Problem der illegalen Wilderei verschärft sich nun noch durch eine neue Seuche, die infolge des Klimawandels auf die Elefanten zu kommt. Allein 2020 waren in Botswana im Okavango Delta beim Moremi Game Reserve 330 tote Tiere gezählt worden und das rätselhafte Massensterben setzte sich auch 2021 fort. Damals hatten die Behörden Cyanobakterien, auch Blaualgen als mögliche Todesursache ausgemacht. Der «Internationale Tier-schutz Fonds» (IFAW) kommt zum Schluss, dass das Massensterben mit einem beschränkten Zugang zu Frischwasser haben und deren Lebensräume u.a. durch die Viehwirtschaft immer mehr eingeengt werden. Zudem ist das Ansteigen der Cyanobakterien auf den Klimawandel zurückzuführen.

Der unsäglichen Wilderung könnte wohl nur Einhalt geboten werden, wenn China den Import stoppen und die Einfuhrbeschränkungen drastisch kontrollieren und auch konsequent durchsetzen würde. Warum also sollte die internationale Staatengemeinschaft und die Länder Afrikas nicht den Hauptverursacher für das Schlachten zur Verantwortung ziehen und den Druck auf China massiv zu erhöhen, um die chinesische Regierung dazu zu bewegen, im eigenen Land gegen den Elefenbeinhandel rigoros vorzugehen. China allein wäre mit all ihren Uberwachungs- und Erziehungsmassnahmen in der Lage, einen signifikaten Beitrag zur Lösung des Problems beizutragen.

Weitere Berichte, die Sie interessieren könnten:

Gadaffis Milliarden in den Händen Zumas untergetaucht

Im Kampf gegen die Apartheid im Untergrund

Die Schweiz als Apartheid Gehilfen der Buren

Bürgerkrieg 93/94: IKRK-Einsätze im «ANC-IFP»-Konflikt

Zu den Print Reportagen von Gerd Müller über Südafrika:

Aargauer Zeitung: Der neue Feind heisst Kriminalität

Tages Anzeiger: Südafrika steht ein Bombenjahr bevor

Tages-Anzeiger: Alle 40 Minuten wird ein Mensch getötet

Travel Inside: Vom ANC-Aktivist zum Tourismuspromotor

Relax & Style: Ökopioniere und sozial Engagierte

Südostschweiz: Beim Büffel auf den Baum  

Sonntags Blick: Tierparks so gross wie die Schweiz

Reiseplaner: Nächster Halt am Zebrastreifen

On Trip: African Healer (On Trip)

Publikationsübersicht nach Ländern

Hier finden Sie einige Publikationen des Fotojournalisten Gerd M. Müller. Einige Reportagen sind allerdings (noch) nicht verlinkt. Wir bitten Sie, dies zu entschuldigen.

ALGERIEN

Wüstenabenteuer: Im Land der versteinerten Träume (Vita Bella)                                    

AMAZONAS CRUISE

AmazonasCruise mit der MS-Bremen (Relax & Style) 

Amazonas: Der Fluss, der zum Meer wird und Millionen Menschen ernährt

Highlights in Brasilien und Amazonas Cruise-Expedition

Klimawandel: Die Chronologie des Versagens

 

ARGENTINIEN/PATAGONIEN

Fast bis ans Ende der Welt  (St. Galler Tagblatt)

Argentinien: Das unberührte Ende (Basler Zeitung)

Pampa, Packeis und paarende Wale (Neue Luzerner Zeitung)

 

AUSTRIA

Steirische Wohlfühloasen der Extraklasse (Wellness Magazin)      AUT_Steiermark_WM /

 

AUSTRALIEN

Australiens Top Spa’s und Gourmet-Lokale (Relax & Style) 

Die Opalschürfer von Coober-Pedy (Neue Luzerner Zeitung)

Die Hoffnung lebt im Untergrund (Solothurner Zeitung)                                   

Weltnaturerbe Fraser Island (Vita Bella)

Den Buckelwalen nah  (Vita Bella)   AUS_Whale_VB

Downunder kannst du was erleben (Vita Bella)

Australien-Spezial                                                                           

Australiens Lockruf zieht Schwärme nach Downunder                

Melbourne zur lebenswertesten Stadt der Welt gekürt

Abenteuerliches Australien und Evolutionsperlen

 

BRASILIEN

Abenteuer von den Anden bis zum Amazonas (Der Bund) BRA_AbenAmazon_Bund
Körperkult und Keuschheit

Highlights in Brasilien und Amazonas Cruise-Expedition

Amazonas: Der Fluss, der zum Meer wird und Millionen Menschen ernährt

Abenteuer Amazonas (Seereisen-Magzin)
Zwischen Strandleben und Götterwelt

 

BOTSWANA

Paradiesische Landschaft – gefährdetes Leben

Afrikas Ureinwohner sterben aus (Mittelland Zeitung)

Die Okavango-Sümpfe – bedrohtes Paradies in der Wüste (Basler Zeitung)                                 

Okavango-Delta, der Garten Eden der Kalahari (Brückenbauer) 

Botswana: Biotop in der Wüste (AT/BT) 

Die Buschmänner sterben aus (Der Bund)   

Okavango Delta: Grandioses Wüsten-Biotop unter Wasser

HIV-Kinder- und Oekoprojekte in 7 afrikanischen Ländern

Besuch bei den Buschmännern im Okavango Delta

 

BORNEO/MALAYSIA

Die Kopfjäger lassen grüssen (Südostschweiz)                                 

Können die Touristen die Orang Utan retten? (Brückenbauer)                    

Malaysia: Bei den versehrten Orang Utans in Borneo 

CAMBODIA

Ankor Wat (Brückenbauer)        

CANADA

Kanadas Westen nicht nur für schnelle Touristen (Basler Zeitung)               CAN_ADAWestCoast_BAZ

Deutschland/Germany

Gutedeltraubenkur in Badenweiler (Relax & Style)                                               

Hotel Bareiss in Beiersbronn  (Relax & Style)              

Süddeutschland’s schönste Golfplätze (Relax & Style)

Bayern’s schönste Golfplätze    (Relax & Style)

Die 3 fantastischen B’s in Baden-Baden
Dresden: Bunte Szenenkultur für Junggebliebene (Der Bund)     DE_DresdenSzene_Bund

 

Dominikanische Republik

Das Mallorca der Karibik ist eine Perle (Der Bund)                                              

Santo Domingo will Mittelpunkt der Welt werden    (Sonntags Zeitung

FRANKREICH/FRENCH GUYANE / POLYNESIEN

Reisetipps Cevennen  (On Trip)             

Frz. Guyana: Bei den Fremdenlegionären im Survival Camp

Langedoc-Roussillon (Die Südostschweiz)

Langedoc-Roussillon: Ausflippen im Land der Wölfe                    

Heideland statt Heidi-Land

Süsee/Frz. Polynesien: Tahiti & Bora Bora

Südsee: An der Pforte zum Paradies (Brückenbauer)                      POLY_PforteZumParadies_BB

Polynesien: Himmel auf Erde (Der Bund) 

Südsee: Eintauchen ins Paradies   (Aargauer Zeitung)

Südsee der Himmel auf Erden (Vita Bella) 

Frz. Guyana/French Guyane

Guayana: Wo Europa im Amazonas ausufert (Mittelland Ztg.)

Frz. Guyana: Bei den Fremdenlegionären im Survival Camp 

Ein Land zum Abheben (Blick)                        

Dorado  (St. Galler Tagblatt) GUY_Kourou

Land zum Abheben  (Sonntags Blick) 

Wo Europa ausläuft, verdampft und verschwindet (Basler Zeitung)

Grossbritannien/UK

Karneval in Trinidad: Lebenslust und Protest (Brückenbauer)      

Protest und Lebenslust zu Calypso in London, Trinidad und Zürich

 

Indien/India

Ayurveda: Am Puls des Lebens   (Wellness live) 

Im Reich der liebenden Hände (Wellness Magazin)

Ayurveda: Im Reich der Liebenden Hände (World of Wellness) 

Am Puls einer faszinierenden Medizin (World of Wellness)    

Sri Lanka’s schönste Ayurveda-Resorts (World of Wellness)

Sri Lanka’s beste Ayurveda-Resorts (World of Wellness)

Ayurveda: Auf dem Weg zum Gleichgewicht (Südostschweiz)

Wellness in der Ayurveda Heimat (Wellness live)                            

Hyppokrates war auch ein Ayurveda-Apostel (Wellness live)    

Wellness in der Ayurveda Heimat Indiens   (Wellness live)              

Wellness in der Ayurveda-Heimat (Wellness live)     

Indien: Kurz vor Moodis Wahl in Gujarat

 

INDONESIEN/LOMBOK

Das Sasak-Reich tritt aus dem Schatten der Götterinsel (Der Bund)

Trekking auf den Mount Rinjani auf Lombok (Tages Anzeiger)

Lombok – die Alternative zu Balis Komerz (Basler Zeitung)      

Das Sasak-Reich tritt aus dem Schatten der Götterinsel (Aargauer Zeitung)               

KENIA

Kenya: Nach ethnischen Konflikten in der IKRK-Mission in Eldoret

KLIMAWANDEL

Klimawandel: Die Chronologie des Versagens

Klimawandel: Wie begegnen wir dem epochalen Wandel?

Artensterben & Pandemien: Werden wir das überleben?

KOLUMBIEN

Tempi passati am Amazonas (Airport Magazin)

Abenteuerlich von den Anden bis zum Amazonas (Der Bund)

 Kolumbien 97: Höllentrip im Dienste der Swissair

KOMOREN

Komoren: Die Parfüminseln tauchen aus der Versenkung empor

KUBA

Die Insel der Idealisten, die sich von Hoffnung (AT/BT)                                     

Zu wenig zum Leben, zuviel zum Sterben (Der Bund)                                              

Kuba-Krise im Touristenparadies (SoZ)      

Die Gesetze der Strasse (Globo)                    

Kuba’s Koloniale Pracht (Relax & Style)                          

Auf nach Varadero – es eilt! (St. Galler Tagblatt)

Ana Fidelia Quirot: Der Sport heilt alle Wunden (Blick)                                     

Lebensfreude in der Karibik (Unterwegs) CUB_Unterwegs

Zuckerinsel im sozialistischen Dollarrausch (Bund)        

Komoren

Komoren:  Die Parfüminseln tauchen aus der Versenkung empor    

Die Parfuminseln tauchen aus der Versenkung empor (Der Bund)

 

LIBANON

Südostschweiz

Libanon: Im Beiruter Flüchtlingscamp «Schatila» 

LAOS

folgt in Kürze

MAURITIUS

Zuckerinsel im Tropenmeer(Wellness live)  MAU_306_RS

Weisse Strände, tiefblaues Meer (Wellness live)  MAU_Constance_WL

Villenparadies am Palmenstrand (World of Wellness)   MAU_Taj_WOW

Aphrodite und Adonis im Spa Paradies(…)  Mau_ritius

 

MALEDIVEN

Vom Anfang bis zum Ende in nur 100 Jahren (St. Galler Tagblatt)              

Ein Requiem aufs Korallenriff (Solo)           

Die Ökozeitbombe tickt und tickt (AT/BT)   

Malediven 93: Die ersten Anzeichen des Klimawandels

 

MALAYSIA

Malaysia: Bei den versehrten Orang Utans in Borneo

Ritz Carlton, Kuala Lumpur (Excellence Inter) MY_RitzCarlton_EXE

MEXICO

Osterprozessionen der Mixteken und Indio-Aufstände

Kreuzweg im Kreuzfeuer der Religionen

Kreuzweg im Kreuzfeuer der Religionen (AT/BT)

Kreuzweg durch die Bergwelt Oaxacas (Der Bund)

Von Göttern inspiriertes, von Gott beselltes Indio-Reich (AT/BT)

Zukunftsprojekt ohne die Sünden der Vergangenheit (SoZ)

Mexicos wilder Süden (BB)

L’Etat rebelle du Chiapas (Contruire)

Kreuzweg der Religionen (NLZ)                     

Lockruf eines geschmähten Kontinents (SoZ)

Kreuzweg der Religionen (SHN)

 

MADEIRA

Excellence International

 NAMIBIA

Namibia: EZA, HIV-Schule Oa Hera und im Reich der Geparde

PHILIPPINES

Philippines 95: Auf den Spuren der Geistheiler

Paradiese kurz vor dem Auftakt zum Massentourismus  (AT/BT)

Inselparadies für Abenteurer    (Südostschweiz)

Paradiese kurz vor dem Massentourismus (Der Bund)  PHI_PHIL1_BUND

Inselparadies für Abenteurer (NLZ)

Inselwelt vom Feinsten (Südostschweiz)

SCHWEIZ

Frost erhitzt die Gemüter. Kuoni Kos Debakel (Sonntags Zeitung)                CH_ErhitzeGemüter_SOZ
Für die Höchsten das Grösste (Sonntags Zeitung)  CH_Lü_SOZ
Auch Mann liebt es auf die sanfte Tour (Sonntags Blick)  CH_MenSPA_Sobli
Keiner kommt ungeschoren davon (Suedostschweiz)  CH_Klima_SO
Swissair: Personelle Probleme schon vor dem Start (Facts)  CH_ErhitzeGemüter_SOZ
Von der Marktgasse an den Malecon (Der Landbote)   CH_CU_Auswanderer_LB
Das Blaue vom Himmel geschworen (Neue Luzerner Zeit. )  CH_BlauevomHimmel
Wie vermeidet man Ferienfrust?  (Der Bund) CH_keinFerienfrust_Bund
Ani Roth Pianistin (Suedostschweiz)   CH_AnyRoth_SO
Entwickungszusammenarbeit: Helfen ist nichts für Abenteurer (Südostschweiz) CH_EZA_SO
Konzentration im Reisebusiness  (Südostschweiz)  CH_KonzentrationReisemarkt
Zur Abschreckung drei Nächte draussen (Weltwoche) CH_Asyl_Weltwoche
Aufbruch zu neuen Horozonten (Der Bund ? )   CH_AufbruchneueUfer
Schweiz: Bahn macht gegen Billigflieger mobil (Pressetext) CH_BahnversusBilligflieger_PT
Trügerische Wachstumseuphorie CH_Wachstumsprognose
Cresta Palalce in (Relax & Style)
Singapore Airlines: Im Himmelbett um die Welt reisen    (Relax & Style)             CH_FIRSTCLASS_RS
Waldhaus Flims: Ein grosser Entwurf Lichtjahre weg (Relax & Style)             CH_WaldhausFlims_RS
Tourismus & Umwelt Forum: Begegnungen auf Reisen   (Eviva)  CH_EVIVAbericht
Online-Reisen: Schweiz strebt eine Mrd. Umsatz an (Pressetext)                  CH_StrebtMrdUmsatz_PT
50 Jahre Jubiläum Zürich Airport
Wird die Swissair überleben?  (Der Bund)                     
Machtprobe im Reisemarkt (Aargauer Zeitung)   MachtpokerTravelmarket
Flugreisen: was gilt beim Gepäck  CH_Gepaecklimits_TAGI

 

SRI LANKA

Sri Lanka 1992: Die Perle des Orients nach dem Bürgerkrieg

Die Ayurveda-Insel (R&S) SRI_LANKA_RS             

Die Perle des Orients nach dem Bürgerkrieg (Südostschweiz)                        SRI_LANKAPerledesaOrients     

Ayurveda-Resort Vergleich (World of Wellness) SRI_LANKAyurResortWoW

Hinter dem Checkpoint liegt das Paradies (Tagi)                                                     

SUEDAFRIKA

Südafrika: Im Kampf gegen die Apartheid im Untergrund

Apartheid: Das rabenschwarze Kapitel der Schweiz

Makabere Waffengeschäfte und Atomdeals gedeckt vom Schweizer Politfilz

Aufarbeitung eines düsteren Kapitels der Schweiz in Südafrika

Die Schweiz als Apartheid-Gehilfe der Buren

Mandelas Besuch in der Schweiz 

Gadaffis Billions disapeared inZumas und Ramaphos hands

Gupta-Leaks: How Zuma and indian Cleptokrates plundering Sout Africa

Tierparks so gross wie die Schweiz (SoBli) ZA_SobliRSA / ZA_SobliTitel

Der Kleine Kosmos am Kap(Sonntags ZeitungZA_KOSMOS_SOZ

Bushmen-Medizin am schönsten Ende der Welt (Wellness live)  ZA_SPA2_WL

Demokratie in den Untergrund   (Wochenzeitung)  ZA_WOZ   

Ökopioniere und sozial Engagierte  (Relax & Style)

Sanfter Tourismus ist von grosser sozialer Bedeutung   (Der Bund)

Der neue Feind heisst Kriminalität  (AZ) 

Beim Büffel auf den Baum  (Südostschweiz)

Guerrissseurs Africaines  (OnTrip)

Nächster Halt am Zebrastreifen (Reiseplaner)

African Healer (On Trip)   (On Trip)  

Südafrika steht ein Bombenjahr bevor (Tages Anzeiger)

Alle 40 Minuten wird ein Mensch getötet (Tages-Anzeiger)

Vom ANC-Aktivist zum Tourismuspromotor (Travel Inside)

Das Shamwari Game Reserve braucht Platz (Travel Inside)  ZA_Shamwari

Wein, Wildlife & Welness (World of Wellness) ZA_AfrikaSPA_WoW

Bien-êtra, dégustation de grand cru et vie sauvage (View)

Das schöne Ende des Kontinents (Neue Luzerner Zeitung)

Auch die Wüste wird erobert (Landbote)

(Vita Bella)  ZA-SüdafrikaVita

(Wellness Magazin)  ZA_Südafrika_WM

 

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

Modeblatt     T&T_CARNIVAL-MODEBLATT

TUERKEI

Planet Kappadokien (Tourbillon)              

VIETNAM

Asiens Tigerstaat auf dem Sprung   (Relax & Style)

Die starken Frauen von Lang Bien  (Modeblatt)

Vietnam entwickelt sich schneller als ein Polaroid  (View)

Vietnam zwischen Coca Coola und Ho Chi Min  (Neue Luzerner Zeitung)

Ein letzter Spaziergang vor dem Vergessen   (BaZ)

Vom Fieber des song voi ergriffen (…)                           

Honda ist wichtiger als Ho Chi Minh (Der Bund)

Ausländische Medien:

Bild Zeitung

Welt am Sonntag

HIV-children and wildlife-conservation programms

Kenyanische Schulkinderunter einem grossen Baum im Haller Park: Die ehemaligen Kalk-Steinbrüche wurden von einem Schweizer renaturiert und in einen Tierpark umgewandelt. Kenyan school-children under a huge tree in Haller Park in Mombasa, where a swiss ren

Im südlichen Afrika sind viele Schulkinderunter HIV-Waisen, denen mit dem Children Trust geholfen wird. BIld: GMC Photopress

Wilderness Safaris is the first and foremeost a conservation organization, which believes, that in “protecting wilderness areas include the local communities in this process of transformation. They operate over 60 luxury lodges and tented camps in seven southern African countries and more than 2500 employees take care about three million of hectars prestine eco-wildlife-parks.

As others espouse their sustainable conservation through responsible tourism philosophy, Wilder-ness areas will increasingly be entrenched under wildlife with additional custodiens in turn recogni-zing this and converting the lands in their custody to the use of wildlife. Wilderness guests have acces to almost 3 Million of hectares of prime wildlife areas in all countries. No fewer than 1600 staff-members out of 2500 employees come from rural communities surrounding the protected areas. Have a look at the following Wilderness Safaris conservation programs and task forces which represents the Wilderness Safaris Ideology and vision. www.wilderness-safaris.com Link zur Broschüre…We are Wilderness Namibia

Wilderness Wildlife Trust

For 20 years, the Wilderness Safaris Wildlife Trust has supported a wide variety of wildlife management, research and education projects in southern Africa. These procets addresses the needs of existing wildlife populations, seek solutions to save threatened species and provide education and training for local people and their communities. The long running Maputaland-Turtle Project in South Africa, the Namib brown Hyaena Project as well as the Namibian Elephant and Giraffe Project are some of the most succesfull cases to protect specific animals. www.wildernesstrust.com

Children in the Wilderness Programm

Schwarze Strassenkinder in Kapstadt auf der Strasse schlafend. Black streetkids in Cape Town.

Südafrika’s Elend: Schwarze Strassenkinder in Kapstadt.

Children in the Wilderness (CITW) began as a result of discussions with actor Paul Newman in Botswana in August 2001. The original premises was that Paul Newman’s children’s organization. The Association of Hole in the Wall Camps, and Wilder Safaris could be combined to create a new uplift-ting programme. In December 2001 the first CIWT camp in Botswana was run successfully. Over the last ten years the programe has expanded into all areas of Wilderness Safaris Operations. Around 5000 children are hosted yearly with innovative fund raising plans such as the annual Tour de Kruger and Tour de Zambesi Circle rides aim to introduce the programme to even more HIV-children.

Kids from 10 to 17 are invited by groups from 16 to 45)and carried into the respective camps to stay for five days at a time given the opportunity to discover these wilderness areas and their wide wildlife. Using a curriculum covering environmental education, HIV/AIDS and nutrition and life skills, CITW camps teach the children the importance of conservation and strive to instill a passion for the environment so that the can become the custodians of these areas in the future. www.childreninthewilderness.com

HIV Task Force for children

Botswana: Bushmen women in the Tsodillo Hills. Buschmänner-Sippe in den Tsodillo Hügel. © GMC Photopress, Gerd Müller, gmc1@gmx.ch

Botswana: Buschmänner-Sippe in den Tsodillo Hills. © GMC Photopress, Gerd Müller

Wilderness Safari has more than 2500 employees in Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia. The company has long recognized the challenges presented by the HIV epidemic on both the company itself and the risk imposed to the employee group. Since 2003, together with Dr. Clive Evian, an author of several books on AIDS, and a community and primary health care specialist, they have developed a programme that has allowed them to manage the effect of this epidemic on both, the business ans well as the affected individuals. With the permission from the employees and assistance of certain key individuals. Wilderness Safaris carried out anonymous, unlinked HIV prevalence surveillance across the entire workforce in their camps and offices. www.wilderness-safaris.com

Further english reports, that might be interesting for you:

India: Treated like a Mahardscha at Soma Kerala Palace

India: Gujarat wants to be a hot spot on the the tourist map

„Best-Brand-Ski-Resorts“ in Austria

Großglockner Resort Kals-Matrei: Highest gourmet restaurant

Detox At The Grand Hotel Lienz in Austria

German special reports:

Südafrika-Spezial |  Australien-Spezial  |  Austria Spezial